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Engine Identification

To choose the proper California catalytic converter or oxygen sensor on this site for any vehicle, you must know basic information about your vehicle and engine.  You need to know the make (e.g. Honda), the model (e.g. Civic), the year (e.g. 2000), and the engine displacement (e.g. 1.6L).


In addition, you may need to know other basic questions, when asked.  These could be the type of transmission (e.g. automatic or standard), the sub-model (e.g. DX or CX), or the door arrangement (e.g. Sedan or Coupe).

And if your vehicle was manufactured after 1995, it is considered OBDII, which will mean you will be required to know the Engine Family Number and Emission Standards (see below).

ALL of the information that we force you to select on CaliforniaLegalConverters.com is to ensure that you select the proper and legal catalytic converter or oxygen sensor for your vehicle.  And therefore you should consider every piece of the information we require to be vital.  If you cannot find an exact match for your vehicle, please send us an email with your year, make and model as we are adding new applications all the time.  Choosing a part that is not a proper match can cause your vehicle to fail the smog test and can also lead to continued “check engine” lights.

 

 

What is an EFN? (Engine Family Number) (Sometimes referred to as "Test Group")

An EFN, or Engine Family Number, is a number given to a specific engine used by a manufacturer. Your EFN is sometimes also referred to as a "Test Group".  Auto manufacturers might use the same engine in many different vehicle models, or they may use several different engines within the same vehicle model. The engine family number identifies which engine is used, and it is important because a vehicle’s emissions are certified by engine family. So, two seemingly identical vehicles may have very different pollutant levels because their engines may be different.

 

Where can I find the EFN of my vehicle?

A vehicle’s EFN, or Test Group, can be found under the hood of the vehicle on the VECI label, or the Vehicle Emissions Control Information label.

Here is an example of what the VECI label might look like. Each manufacturer’s label looks a little different, but they all have the same basic information, including the engine family number.

Locating the VECI label on a vehicle can be challenging, as there are several possible mounting locations on your vehicle. Typically, a decal or tag can be found on the firewall, radiator support, or under the hood.  Here is an example of a VECI placed under the hood:

To see more examples of VECI labels and their placement on various vehicles, please see our VECI Examples Page

 

 

What is an Emission Standard? (e.g. Tier 1, TLEV, LEV)

As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, “Emission Standards” would be defined going forward, as a way to classify vehicles according to their output of combustion byproduct gases.

Tier 1 is the initial classification and emission standard of all vehicles which are assigned an EFN from 1994 on, and that are also under 8500 pounds.

Tier 1 vehicles were later further broken down to emission standard categories.  These are:

-          TLEV – Transitional Low Emission Vehicle

-          LEV – Low Emission Vehicle

-          ULEV – Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle

-          SULEV – Super-Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle

-          ZEV – Zero Emission Vehicle

 

Where can I find the Emission Standard of my vehicle?

Similar to the EFN, your vehicle’s Emission Standard can be found under the hood of the vehicle on the VECI label, or the Vehicle Emissions Control Information label.

Here is an example of what the VECI label might look like. Each manufacturer’s label looks a little different.  Your VECI should contain the emission standard category.  You can expect to see either “Tier 1” or one of the more specific classifications, such as “TLEV” or “LEV”.

 

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